Loneliness is an issue of inequality

By Claire Niedzwiedz

Loneliness is increasingly being prioritised as a public health issue, due to its strong links to illness and premature mortality.  Our new article published in Preventive Medicine (open access version here) highlights that older people’s loneliness varies according to their level of wealth: those with the least experience more loneliness than the wealthiest. We found that taking part in formal social activities, such as attending a sport or social club, may help to reduce the gap in loneliness between the poorest and richest older people, especially among men. But wealthier people are on the whole more likely to participate in such activities.

Continue reading Loneliness is an issue of inequality

Is it time to reconsider the impact agenda?

By Niamh K Shortt

In our latest paper published in Social Science and Medicine we critique the way ‘impact’ is measured within the UK’s Research Excellence Framework* (REF) and in doing so we propose an alternative measurement, one based on enlightenment and process rather than outcomes.

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Source: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Water_drop_impact_on_a_water-surface.jpg

 

Continue reading Is it time to reconsider the impact agenda?

The impact of a motorway extension in Glasgow on road traffic accidents

Funded by the NIHR PHR Programme

A new study published by Dr Jon Olsen at CRESH and colleagues at CEDAR in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health evaluated the impact of the 5-mile M74 motorway extension on road accidents that resulted in a casualty. The study found that it had no impact on the already decreasing trend of road accidents in the area. Continue reading The impact of a motorway extension in Glasgow on road traffic accidents

Seeing e-cigarettes in shops may influence their use by teenagers

By Jamie Pearce

Adolescents who recall seeing e-cigarettes in shops are more likely to have tried them in the past and are more likely to intend to try them in the future, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

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Source: http://www.ecigclick.co.uk. Creative Commons License

Continue reading Seeing e-cigarettes in shops may influence their use by teenagers

Regions of Europe gaining migrants have lower death rates

By Helena Tunstall

New research just published by CRESH in the European Journal of Public Health suggests there is a strong correlation between net migration, 2000-2010, and age- and sex- standardised death rates, 2008-2010 among the regions of Europe (Figure 1). The recent ‘migrant crisis’ in Europe has ensured that European political debate about migration, long centred on immigration, has continued to focus upon areas receiving migrants. This analysis suggests however that difficulties associated with immigration are the problems of advantage. Regions of Europe which experienced significant population growth through migration, were found mostly in Western countries with higher incomes and lower death rates. In contrast, Europe regions with net out-migration, predominantly located in the East, are burdened by the combined problems of low incomes, high death rates and population decline.

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Figure 1 Death rates and migration among European regions

 

Continue reading Regions of Europe gaining migrants have lower death rates

Job available: research associate, looking at impacts of woodlands on health

The CRESH team have a new post available. We’re looking for a quantitative researcher to work with us, and our colleagues at OPENspace, on a project looking at the impact of woodland improvement on community health. You can read more about the project in our protocol paper.

The job will be based in Glasgow and has funding until the 31 March 2017. The closing date for applications is 27 March 2016.

Continue reading Job available: research associate, looking at impacts of woodlands on health

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