Tag Archives: depression

Neighbourhood problems lead to depression, but effects vary across countries

Neighbourhood characteristics are linked to mental health in older age, but the magnitude of effects might differ across countries. Using data from 16 different countries, our paper in the American Journal of Epidemiology indicated that country-level social, political, economic and environmental characteristics may explain differences in how neighbourhood affects mental health.

Depression, local area and macro-level context

Depression is a common mental disorder with substantial disability and economic burden worldwide. More than 10% of adults aged 50 years and older present depressive symptoms with an even greater proportion of the population suffering in older age groups. Older adults spend more time in their neighbourhood, so that social and physical features of the residential area become increasingly important for them.

Signs of neighbourhood disorder, such as crime, vandalism and exposure to rubbish, are thought to indicate problems in the residential environment, by elevating the level of stress and fear among residents. On the other hand, positive aspects of neighbourhoods such as social cohesion – which is often characterised as a sense of community, help and support among neighbours – have the potential to buffer the effects of stress and contribute to healthy ageing. Both neighbourhood disorder and social cohesion has been linked to mental health problems.

Neighbourhoods are situated within macro-level environments capturing larger geographic areas such as local authorities, counties or even countries (Figure 1). Policies, as well as social, economic and environmental characteristics of macro environments can affect citizens’ life and health, and also shape the physical and social characteristics of local communities, where people live and age. It is important, as both local and macro-level environments are modifiable, presenting opportunities for improving population mental health and contributing to healthy ageing.

Figure 1: Local and macro-level determinants of depression

Neighbourhoods influence mental health among older adults

We investigated the associations between neighbourhood disorder, lack of social cohesion and depression among adults aged 50 and over. Longitudinal information on perceived neighbourhood characteristics and depressive symptoms across 16 high-income countries were utilised, including 32000 older adults. Results showed that living in an area with significant neighbourhood disorder increased the chance of developing depression (Figure 2), and so did lack of social cohesion (Figure 3). If people were already in retirement, effects became stronger.

Figure 2: Neighbourhood disorder impacting depression across 16 high-income countries. Odds Ratios <1.0 indicate decreased odds of depression by exposure to neighbourhood disorder; Odds Ratios >1.0 express increased odds. Small black diamonds are country-specific estimates, larger empty diamonds are pooled effects across group of countries. Abbreviations: ELSA, English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; HRS, Health and Retirement Study; SHARE, Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe.

Neighbourhood effects differ across countries

As the magnitude of the associations varied across the 16 included countries, we further explored country-level differences.

Figure 3: Lack of social cohesion impacting depression across 16 high-income countries. Odds Ratios <1.0 indicate decreased odds of depression by lack of social cohesion; Odds Ratios >1.0 express increased odds. Small black diamonds are country-specific estimates, larger empty diamonds are pooled effects across group of countries. Abbreviations: ELSA, English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; HRS, Health and Retirement Study; SHARE, Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe.

Amongst other, we found that in countries with higher population density, lack of social cohesion was more detrimental for mental health. Particularly in the oldest age groups, where limited mobility is more likely present, neighbours can be an important source of social and emotional support. In countries where people live closer to each other, not having proper social ties to neighbours can lead to social isolation and higher risk of developing mental health problems.

Also, in countries with higher pension spending, the adverse effect of neighbourhood disorder on depression was buffered for individuals already in retirement. It is plausible that by providing material resources, more generous welfare states equip older people to deal with stressors arising from less safe and deteriorated residential neighbourhoods.

Macro-level context and policy recommendations

Understanding how larger context can influence mental health inequalities across neighbourhoods has the potential to inform policy, and provide more tailored recommendations. For example, tackling crime and vandalism in countries with lower pension spending would be particularly beneficial for mental health, as older people has less material resources to protect themselves from the negative effects of neighbourhood disorder. Supporting social ties and improving social capital in densely populated areas may stronger contribute to healthy ageing and lead to better mental health among older adult.

By Gergő Baranyi, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh

Mental health problems are common among prisoners in low-income and middle-income countries

In a major international review, we found very high rates of psychiatric and substance use disorders among prisoners in low-income and middle-income countries. The results from the systematic review and meta-analysis published in Lancet Global Health showed that the prevalence of psychosis, depression, and drug and alcohol use disorders is much higher in this marginalised population in comparison to the community, pointing to unmet needs and calling for action in research and policy.

Mental health and substance use problems are common among individuals involved in the criminal justice system. Incarcerated men and women often come from disadvantaged socioeconomic and family background, and frequently have a life history of victimisation and substance use, making them more vulnerable to mental health problems. While in prison, they often remain undiagnosed and untreated. Prisoners with unmet mental health needs have higher mortality, especially by suicide, and greater risk of recidivism and reoffending after release in the community, leading to multiple imprisonments.

Although 70% of the worldwide prison population are residing in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC), almost all scientific evidence is coming from studies conducted in high-income countries. It is an important limitation as recommendations from a mostly Western context might not be applicable or generalizable to poorly resourced settings. Prison conditions in LMICs are usually very harsh, characterised by overcrowding, poor nutrition, and sanitation, and limited or complete lack of access to basic health care. To provide evidence for future research and policy making, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on prison prevalence studies in LMICs.

After screening 6000 titles and abstracts from 17 electronic global databases, we identified 23 relevant publications based on 14,527 prisoners from 13 different LMICs. Considering a one year time interval, approximately 6.2% of the prisoners had psychosis, 16.0% major depression, 3.8% alcohol use disorders, and 5.1% drug use disorders. To illustrate the immense burden of mental health problems, we quantified the difference between the prevalence among prisoners in each sample and in the sex-matched general populations of the respective countries. Prevalence rates among prisoners were 16 times higher for psychosis, 6 times higher for major depression and illicit drug use disorder prevalence, and twice as high for alcohol use disorders, indicating a significant public health concern and large unmet health care needs in this marginalised group. Moreover, rates in prison populations of LMICs might be even higher than in high-income countries.

Based on our findings, we presented several implications and recommendations for research and policy.

  1. While a review from 2012 on prison mental health in high-income countries identified over 100 samples, we were able to find only 23 studies from a much larger and diverse group of countries. There is a need further evidence from LMICs to adequately plan interventions for prisoners with mental disorders, especially from regions underrepresented in research such as Central and East Asia, and Central America.
  2. Because correctional facilities in LMICs often lack basic health care, the implementation of cost-effective interventions and scalable treatments for individuals with mental health problems is crucial.
  3. Imprisonment could present an opportunity to treat people with mental health and substance use problems who otherwise would be difficult to reach for health services. National governments in LMICs should move the responsibility for prison health care from prison administrations to the national health services.
  4. Since human right violations, and physical and psychological abuse are more common in resource-poor correctional settings, increasing mental health literacy among staff and protecting the rights and health of people with mental illnesses should be a priority for penal justice policies.

The invited comment on our paper gives a valuable and very practical recommendation on how to improve mental health services in correctional facilities. Training prison health workers by mental health professionals using the WHO’s Intervention Guide for mental disorders (mhGAP-IG), could be a cost-effective and valuable programme for addressing the treatment gap among prisoners in LMICs and coming closer to the Sustainable Development Goals declared by the United Nations.

By Gergo Baranyi, PhD Student in Human Geography and Marie Sklodowska-Curie Early Stage Researcher, The University of Edinburgh