Tag Archives: migration

Regions of Europe gaining migrants have lower death rates

By Helena Tunstall

New research just published by CRESH in the European Journal of Public Health suggests there is a strong correlation between net migration, 2000-2010, and age- and sex- standardised death rates, 2008-2010 among the regions of Europe (Figure 1). The recent ‘migrant crisis’ in Europe has ensured that European political debate about migration, long centred on immigration, has continued to focus upon areas receiving migrants. This analysis suggests however that difficulties associated with immigration are the problems of advantage. Regions of Europe which experienced significant population growth through migration, were found mostly in Western countries with higher incomes and lower death rates. In contrast, Europe regions with net out-migration, predominantly located in the East, are burdened by the combined problems of low incomes, high death rates and population decline.

EJPH_scatterplot_blog
Figure 1 Death rates and migration among European regions

 

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How difficult life events influence risk of mental health problems and moves to deprived neighbourhoods

We’ve just published a journal article that assesses the links between difficult life events, residential moves and spatial inequalities in mental health in the UK.

Repossession2We find that people that move following difficult life events, such as relationship breakdown and eviction, have poor mental health and distinctive patterns of mobility.

Difficult life events appear to both harm mental health and residential opportunities, increasing the likelihood that people with poor mental health will live in socio-economically deprived neighbourhoods. Moves related to difficult life events could reinforce socioeconomic inequalities in health between areas by concentrating people with poor health in disadvantaged areas.

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Are people in poor health more likely to move to poorer quality physical environments?

By Helena Tunstall

Grangemouth Refinery, UK
Grangemouth Refinery, UK

It is well known that people living in neighbourhoods with poorer quality physical environments tend to have worse health than those living in better quality environments. For example, those in areas with higher levels of air pollution have greater risk of death from respiratory and cardiovascular disease. However, the vast majority of these studies do not consider the possibility that patterns of residential moves may concentrate people with poorer health in certain types of environments. This is important because it is feasible that the links between the environment and health may, at least partially, be explained by the migration of people with poorer health to poor quality environments. Continue reading Are people in poor health more likely to move to poorer quality physical environments?

CRESH goes Stateside: International Medical Geography Symposium 2013

by Helena Tunstall, Catherine Tisch and Anna Kenyon

The 15th International Medical Geography Symposium, the biggest international academic health geography conference, took place July 7-12 this year, at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, USA. This conference is always a fun, friendly and inspirational meeting: a real CRESH highlight. This time we were represented by Helena Tunstall (presenting on ‘triple jeopardy’ in England and impacts of internal migration on health inequalities in UK), Anna Kenyon (presenting on walkability measures and walking outcomes in Scotland) and Catherine Tisch (presenting on tobacco environments and adolescent smoking behaviours in Scotland).  Abstracts for these talks can be found in the program, but watch this space for news of forthcoming publications on these topics. In this short blog post we note some thoughts arising from the conference.    Continue reading CRESH goes Stateside: International Medical Geography Symposium 2013